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Title

every… Bernd & Hilla Becher Prison Type Gasholder, every… Bernd & Hilla Becher Spherical Type Gasholder, every… Bernd & Hilla Becher Gable Sided House

2004
printed 2005

Artist

Idris Khan

England

1978 –

Alternate image of every… Bernd & Hilla Becher Prison Type Gasholder,
every… Bernd & Hilla Becher Spherical Type Gasholder,
every… Bernd & Hilla Becher Gable Sided House by Idris Khan
Alternate image of every… Bernd & Hilla Becher Prison Type Gasholder,
every… Bernd & Hilla Becher Spherical Type Gasholder,
every… Bernd & Hilla Becher Gable Sided House by Idris Khan
Alternate image of every… Bernd & Hilla Becher Prison Type Gasholder,
every… Bernd & Hilla Becher Spherical Type Gasholder,
every… Bernd & Hilla Becher Gable Sided House by Idris Khan
  • Details

    Dates
    2004
    printed 2005
    Media category
    Photograph
    Materials used
    triptych: 3 Lamda digital C prints mounted on aluminium
    Edition
    A/P [1 + 2 artist proofs]
    Dimensions
    triptych: each 201.0 x 154.0 cm image/sheet; 206.5 x 159.5 x 4.0 cm frame
    Signature & date

    Signed and dated u.l. verso each frame, blue fibre-tipped pen "Idris Khan... 2004".

    Credit
    Gift of Geoff and Vicki Ainsworth 2005
    Location
    20th-century galleries (lower level 1)
    Accession number
    9.2005.a-c
    Copyright
    © Idris Khan, courtesy Victoria Miro Gallery, London

    Reproduction requests

    Artist information
    Idris Khan

    Works in the collection

    1

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  • About

    Idris Khan takes inspiration from a diverse range of cultural sources. He borrows photographs, musical scores and theological texts and uses digital technology to create layered images that push his source materials to the point of abstraction.

    In each of these photographs, Khan has overlayed photographs by celebrated German artists Bernd and Hilla Becher, whose own works are displayed on the adjacent wall. The resulting composites take on the appearance of charcoal drawings. Khan became fascinated by the rise of digital photography in the early 2000s and the resulting proliferation of images. As an artist, rather than creating new images and adding to the deluge, he chose to reinterpret existing photographs and texts. Through a process of accumulation, repetition and superimposition, Khan brings emotion, energy and movement to static images.

  • Exhibition history

    Shown in 1 exhibition