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Title

Hintha bird weight

19th century

Artists

Unknown Artist

  • Details

    Place where the work was made
    Myanmar
    Date
    19th century
    Media category
    Sculpture
    Materials used
    bronze, lost wax
    Dimensions
    11.5 x 8 x 8 cm
    Credit
    Gift of Mr F. Storch 1984
    Location
    Not on display
    Accession number
    65.1984
    Copyright

    Reproduction requests

    Share
  • About

    Popularly referred to as 'opium weights', they were used to gauge the weight of the daily items of commerce found in the markets. Weights are usually in the form of birds or quadrupeds. The Hintha bird is one of the most commonly depicted birds. The emblem of the Mon kingdom which once ruled over lower Burma, it has a duck's beak and feet and a crested comb. The small seal impressed on the hexagonal base below the hintha's right foot is the official seal legalizing the weight. Such seals were applied by officials responsible for checking the weights.

    Asian Art Department, AGNSW, March 1984

  • Places

    Where the work was made

    Myanmar

  • Exhibition history

    Shown in 1 exhibition

  • Bibliography

    Referenced in 1 publication

    • Arts of Asia, 'Burmese 'Opium' weights', pg. 73-81, Hong Kong, Jan 1982-Feb 1982.