We acknowledge the Gadigal of the Eora Nation, the traditional custodians of the Country on which the Art Gallery of NSW stands.

Title

(Leaping deer)

circa 1944-1958

Artist

Ethleen Palmer

Australia

1908 - 1965

No image
  • Details

    Date
    circa 1944-1958
    Media category
    Print
    Materials used
    colour screenprint on thick buff paper
    Edition
    proof
    Dimensions
    27.1 x 36.8 cm image; 35.6 x 44.5 cm sheet
    Signature & date

    Signed l.r., pencil "Ethleen Palmer". Not dated. Signed with monogram in image to print l.r.

    Credit
    Gift of Norman and Daphne Mills 2000
    Location
    Not on display
    Accession number
    313.2000
    Copyright
    © Estate of Ethleen Palmer
    Artist information
    Ethleen Palmer

    Works in the collection

    11

    Share
  • About

    Ethleen Palmer studied at East Sydney Technical College under Rayner Hoff and Phyllis Shillito from 1924-27 and began experimenting with relief printmaking in 1933.

    Major influences on her work were the Austrian artist Norbertine Bresslern-Roth, whose prints were shown in Sydney from 1926-28, and possibly the work of Claude Flight, whose work and teaching was so influential on Australian printmakers such as Dorrit Black, Eveline Syme and Ethel Spowers.

    She showed her first prints in 1933 at the Society of Arts and Crafts in Sydney, and continued to experiment with techniques throughout the decade. She developed a complex printing technique of subtly overlaying colour, producing prints strongly reminiscent of Japanese prints, both in composition and execution. By 1939 her work was represented in all major state collections. WWII caused a break in her output, but in the late 1940s she began experimenting with screenprints, one of the first artists in Australia to do so, and possibly the first in Sydney.

    Considerable interest has been shown towards Australian inter-war printmaking in recent years, but Ethleen Palmer's work has been somewhat overlooked. Nevertheless, her importance to the development of Australian printmaking, especially in screenprints and the adoption of a Japanese aesthetic deserves greater recognition.

    Australian Art Department, AGNSW, 2000

Other works by Ethleen Palmer

See more works