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An image of Turns in Arabba by Hany Armanious
Alternate image of Turns in Arabba by Hany Armanious Alternate image of Turns in Arabba by Hany Armanious Alternate image of Turns in Arabba by Hany Armanious
Alternate image of Turns in Arabba by Hany Armanious Alternate image of Turns in Arabba by Hany Armanious Alternate image of Turns in Arabba by Hany Armanious
Alternate image of Turns in Arabba by Hany Armanious Alternate image of Turns in Arabba by Hany Armanious Alternate image of Turns in Arabba by Hany Armanious
Alternate image of Turns in Arabba by Hany Armanious Alternate image of Turns in Arabba by Hany Armanious Alternate image of Turns in Arabba by Hany Armanious
Alternate image of Turns in Arabba by Hany Armanious Alternate image of Turns in Arabba by Hany Armanious Alternate image of Turns in Arabba by Hany Armanious
Alternate image of Turns in Arabba by Hany Armanious Alternate image of Turns in Arabba by Hany Armanious Alternate image of Turns in Arabba by Hany Armanious

Hany Armanious

(Egypt, Australia 1962 – )

Title
Turns in Arabba
Year
2005
Media categories
Time-based media, Sculpture
Materials used
clay, wax, wick, pewter, plaster, polyurethane, wood, formply, silicone, peppercorns, ceramic, drums, speaker, sound
Dimensions

240.0 x 200.0 x 60.0 cm approx.

Credit
Contemporary Collection Benefactors' 2006
Accession number
8.2006.a-xxx
Copyright
© Hany Armanious
Location
Not on display
Further information

"This work is the final configuration of a project spanning the last two years. Initially I began by transposing Abba music to Arabic instrumentation. Considering this conflation as a sculptural key I began replicating objects that were reminiscent of both Middle-Eastern forms and modernist Scandinavian design. This process was not linear, but circuitous with unexpected and complex associations.

In trying to cast the cavity of the bell I realised that its clapper would interfere with the casting. This reminded me of the problem of trying to fill a pepper mill with peppercorns and having the shaft of the mill get in the way. Increasingly, the task was to try and articulate this central axis, so that the shape of things turned or spun on a central point became a feature of the work.

Another feature is the relationship between the function of an object and its manufacture. Each of these objects is a type of machine that acts on matter in a specific way, be it grinding filling or melting, but they are also a by-product of another physical process. Within this exchange paradoxes arise as seen in the making of a candle, whereby a wick placed centrally within the cast wax is part of its own undoing. It is this undermining of the nature of the article that led me to simulate lathed wood in clay, electric lamps as candles, and sand Arabic bongo drums as the outer case of a mould.

Overall, the piece presents an interrogation of form that, once initiated, snowballs into an ensemble of objects that speak not only of their origin but also of their poetic potential."

Hany Armanious, 'National Sculpture Prize and Exhibition 2005', National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2005, p.14

Bibliography (4)

Betsy Brennan, Vogue Living Australia, 'The Alchemist', pg.85-86, Sydney, Jan 2006-Feb 2006, 85 (colour illus.), 86.

Julie Gough, Art and Australia (Vol. 43, No. 2), 'Art Review', pg.276, Paddington, Dec 2005-Feb 2006, 276.

National Gallery of Australia, National Sculpture Prize and Exhibition 2005, 2005, 14, 15 (colour illus.). illustration is a detail

Wayne Tunnicliffe, Contemporary: Art Gallery of New South Wales Contemporary Collection, 'Reality bytes', pg.382-423, Sydney, 2006, 388, 389 (colour illus.).

Exhibition history (2)

National Sculpture Prize and Exhibition, National Gallery of Australia, Parkes, 15 Jul 2005–09 Oct 2005

Intelligent Design, Institute of Modern Art, Fortitude Valley, 21 Oct 2006–25 Nov 2006