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An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson An image of Sketchbook by James Gleeson

James Gleeson

(Australia 21 Nov 1915 – 20 Oct 2008)

Title
Sketchbook
Year
1978-1979
Media categories
Sketchbook, Drawing
Materials used
charcoal, ink wash, pencil, chalk, pen and ink
Dimensions

33.4 x 25.5 cm leaf; 34.0 x 26.7 x 2.2 cm closed book; 34.0 x 52.1 x 2.2 cm open book

Signature & date
Each drawing signed and dated, charcoal "Gleeson/ [from 24.12.78 ... 1.1.79]"
Credit
Purchased 2012
Accession number
5.2012.a-bb
Location
Not on display
Further information

The drawings in this sketchbook were a critical part of Gleeson's re-invention of himself as a painter beginning with an intensive period of drawing between 1977 & 1982. His subsequent new large-scaled paintings, for which he was later highly acclaimed, were first exhibited in 1983.

The artist considered this to be his finest sketchbook. Some of the drawings are among the most powerful Gleeson has made, where he is at his most free and imaginative in the dreamlike mis-shaping of corruptible flesh. They reveal the influence of Dali and Picasso, but particularly Picasso in his return to classicism during 1916-24.