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Title

Shigaraki


Artist

Daniel KELLY

United States of America, Japan

1947 -


About

Kelly was born in Idaho in the USA and received his training at the Tokuriki Atelier in Kyoto where he still lives. This particular print is a rich mix of gesture, texture and tradition.

Shigaraki is one of the most famous of the Japanese ceramics, particularly the typical large, unglazed red-orange stoneware jars. The history of the Shigaraki kilns, situated to the east of Kyoto, dates back some 700 years when the kilns produced items such as seed storage jars for local farmers and burial jars for the local Buddhist temples. Shigaraki ware became famous when tea masters started using them in the tea ceremony from the sixteenth century. Through the influence of the tea aesthetic, they were admired for their unpretentiousness, their simplicity and honesty of form, and the textures and colours of their surfaces. The shape of Shigaraki pieces is uneven as the pieces are formed by the ancient technique of coiling and smoothing; the surface is rough and patterned with the flecks of white quartz peculiar to Shigaraki clay.

Jackie Menzies, Contemporary Japanese Prints: The Urban Bonsai, 1992, pg. 56.


Details


Place where the work was made

Japan


Period

Heisei period 1989 - → Japan


Date

1989


Media category

Print


Materials used

lithograph, woodcut and chine collé


Edition

2/4


Dimensions

98.0 x 63.0 cm sheet


Signature & date

Signed l.l.to l.c., pencil "Daniel Kelly". Not dated.


Credit

Gift of the artist 1993


Location

Not on display


Accession number

432.1993


Artist information

Daniel KELLY

Works in the collection

1


Place

Where the work was made
Japan

Shown in 1 exhibition

Exhibition history


Referenced in 1 publication

Bibliography


Jackie Menzies, Contemporary Japanese Prints : The Urban Bonsai, Sydney, 1992, 51 (colour illus.), 56. cat.no. 27