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Title

The moon's invention - Hōzō temple, from the series One hundred aspects of the moon

Jun 1891


Artist

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi

Japan

1839 - 1892


About

The head priest of Hōzōin Buddhist temple in Nara was Kakuzenbō Hōin In’ei, who came from a line of 'kuge', lords attached to the imperial court. By the second half of the 16th century he had established a fencing school at the temple. Here, he looks into water at the reflection of the moon. Interestingly, the crescent moon in the sky looks to be a cross piece in the practice fencing spear he is holding in his hand. This could be an allusion to a spear In’ei created called kamayari (sickle-spear; also seen in 258.2012.23) that has a very sharp cross piece, which was a famous development at the time. In’ei eventually came to the realisation his Buddhist beliefs were inconsistent with his martial art practice and gave away his weapons.


Details


Alternative title

tsuki no hatsumei - Hōzōin


Place where the work was made

Japan


Date

Jun 1891


Media category

Print


Materials used

colour woodblock; ōban


Dimensions

39.0 x 26.0 cm


Signature & date

Signed and dated.


Credit

Yasuko Myer Bequest Fund 2012


Accession number

258.2012.95


Artist information

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi

Artist profile

Works in the collection

107


Place

Where the work was made
Japan

Shown in 1 exhibition

Exhibition history


Referenced in 3 publications

Bibliography


Yuriko Iwakiri, Yoshitoshi Tsuki hyakushi (Yoshitoshi’s One hundred aspects of the moon), Tokyo, 2010. General reference; Another edition was reproduced

John Stevenson, Yoshitoshi's One hundred aspects of the moon, Seattle, 1992, (colour illus.). cat.no.95; Another edition was reproduced

Chris UHLENBECK, Yoshitoshi: masterpieces from the Ed Freis collection, Leiden, 2011, 135-136. General reference; Another edition was reproduced