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Title

The moon of the Milky Way, from the series One hundred aspects of the moon

Sep 1886


Artist

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi

Japan

1839 - 1892


About

The two figures looking at each other across the Milky Way represent the stars Vega and Altair, or in Japanese (originally Chinese) mythology, the Lord of Heaven’s daughter Shokujo (the Weaver Maiden) and Kengyū (the celestial Herdsboy). Because Shokujo’s matrimonial duties led her to neglect her work, her father decreed that she and Kengyū could only meet once a year. The story is the basis of the Japanese Tanabata festival, during which young people write romantic poems and hang them on bamboo branches in front of their houses. Traditionally, girls pray to the Shokujo star for sewing skills and a faithful husband like Kengyū.


Details


Alternative title

Ginga no tsuki


Place where the work was made

Japan


Date

Sep 1886


Media category

Print


Materials used

colour woodblock; ōban


Dimensions

39.0 x 26.0 cm


Signature & date

Signed and dated.


Credit

Yasuko Myer Bequest Fund 2012


Accession number

258.2012.40


Artist information

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi

Artist profile

Works in the collection

107


Place

Where the work was made
Japan

Shown in 1 exhibition

Exhibition history


Referenced in 3 publications

Bibliography


Yuriko Iwakiri, Yoshitoshi Tsuki hyakushi (Yoshitoshi’s One hundred aspects of the moon), Tokyo, 2010. General reference; Another edition was reproduced

John Stevenson, Yoshitoshi's One hundred aspects of the moon, Seattle, 1992, (colour illus.). cat.no.40; Another edition was reproduced

Chris UHLENBECK, Yoshitoshi: masterpieces from the Ed Freis collection, Leiden, 2011, 135-136. General reference; Another edition was reproduced