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Title

Cassia-tree moon - Wu Gang, from the series One hundred aspects of the moon

Mar 1886


Artist

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi

Japan

1839 - 1892


About

According to Chinese legend, the Daoist adept Wu Gang (Gōbetsu in Japanese) used the magical powers of seeds from the giant cassia trees on the moon for evil purposes. His Sisyphus-like punishment from the gods was to chop off the branches of the cassia trees on the moon, which would immediately grow back again. In this print Wu Gang wears Chinese clothes, combining an immortal’s robes with a peasant’s straw hat, and carries a huge ceremonial axe. Instead of showing him suffering from the strenuous task, Yoshitoshi chose to show Wu Gang excited and proud of his new workplace, the bright moon above.


Details


Alternative title

tsuki no katsura - Gobetsu


Place where the work was made

Japan


Date

Mar 1886


Media category

Print


Materials used

colour woodblock; ōban


Dimensions

39.0 x 26.0 cm


Signature & date

Signed and dated.


Credit

Yasuko Myer Bequest Fund 2012


Location

Not on display


Accession number

258.2012.26


Artist information

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi

Works in the collection

107


Place

Where the work was made
Japan

Referenced in 3 publications

Bibliography


Yuriko Iwakiri, Yoshitoshi Tsuki hyakushi (Yoshitoshi’s One hundred aspects of the moon), Tokyo, 2010. General reference; Another edition was reproduced

John Stevenson, Yoshitoshi's One hundred aspects of the moon, Seattle, 1992, (colour illus.). cat.no. 26; Another edition was reproduced

Chris UHLENBECK, Yoshitoshi: masterpieces from the Ed Freis collection, Leiden, 2011, 135-136. General reference; Another edition was reproduced