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Sol LeWitt Affinities and Resonances

A large wall with purple looping lines on a red background. An arched doorway leads into a gallery filled with paintings and sculptures.

Installation view of Sol LeWitt Wall drawing #955, Loopy Doopy (red and purple) 2000 at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, first drawn by Paolo Arao, Nicole Awai, Hidemi Nomura, Jean Shin, Frankie Woodruff at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, November 2000; current installation drawn by Kit Bylett, Andrew Colbert, Troy Donaghy, Szymon Dorabialski, Gabriel Hurier, Rachel Levine, Owen Lewis, Nadia Odlum, Tim Silver, Alexis Wildman, August 2022 © Estate of Sol LeWitt/ARS, Copyright Agency

Discover the affinities and resonances between one of the 20th century’s most influential artists, Australian Central Desert painting, and contemporary American and Aboriginal musicians

Sol LeWitt Affinities and Resonances

27 August 2022 – 12 February 2023

Ground level

Art Gallery of NSW

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Sol LeWitt (1928–2007) was a pivotal figure in 20th-century American art whose ideas continue to have an impact on artists around the world. Many of his artworks were conceived as sets of instructions that could be executed by others. He often likened his process to that of a composer whose music acquired subtle differences with each new performance. 

This exhibition, presented in collaboration with Kaldor Public Art Projects, places LeWitt’s work in conversation with paintings by Anmatyerr artists Emily Kame Kngwarreye and Gloria Tamerre Petyarre.

It also introduces three musical commissions, each developed collaboratively by an American musician and an Aboriginal musician: Chuck Johnson and JWPATON; Steve Gunn and amby downs; and Claire Rousay and E Fishpool.

LeWitt’s enormous Wall drawing #955, Loopy Doopy (red and purple) 2000 – installed in the John Kaldor Family Hall on the ground level – reveals the influence Australian Central Desert painters had on his practice, including Kngwarreye, whose work he first encountered at the Venice Biennale in 1997. LeWitt described feeling a ‘great affinity’ for Kngwarreye’s work and went on to become an avid collector of paintings by her, Petyarre and other Central Desert artists. 

Sol LeWitt: Affinities and Resonances explores the connections between these seemingly disparate art-making traditions while also examining the processes of creation and collaboration through three musical works composed in response to Loopy Doopy (red and purple).

Also on display is LeWitt’s Wall drawing 388 in the 20th-century galleries on lower level 1.

A dense patterning of overlapping yellow and brownish-red lines on a brownish-red background

Emily Kame Kngwarreye Untitled 1995, private collection, Sydney © Estate of Emily Kame Kngwarreye / Copyright Agency

A dense patterning of wavy grey lines on a yellow background

Sol LeWitt Tangled bands 2002, John Kaldor Family Collection at the Art Gallery of New South Wales © Estate of Sol LeWitt/ARS, Copyright Agency

A dense patterning of wavy black lines on a white background

Sol LeWitt Tangled bands 2002, John Kaldor Family Collection at the Art Gallery of New South Wales © Estate of Sol LeWitt/ARS, Copyright Agency

A dense patterning of wavy black and red lines on a grey background

Sol LeWitt Irregular grid 2001, John Kaldor Family Collection at the Art Gallery of New South Wales © Estate of Sol LeWitt/ARS, Copyright Agency

Sol LeWitt: Affinities and Resonances is a partnership between Kaldor Public Art Projects and the Art Gallery of New South Wales

Kaldor Public Art Projects lead patron

Kaldor Public Art Projects philanthropic partner

Kaldor Public Art Projects government partner