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Process diary

Li-Hsien Lee

Ascham School

Artwork title
The Artyssey
HSC year
2014
ARTEXPRESS year
2015
Expressive form
Graphic design
Artist’s statement

By subverting traditional tropes of Chinese culture, particularly the notions of the ‘young foolish grasshopper’ and ‘wise old master’, my work depicts the odyssey of an art disciple who believes that Renaissance values are the epitome of art. Animals from the Chinese zodiac symbolise the phases of the disciple’s journey as he explores his previous beliefs, the concept of knowledge, and whether one can ever attain a full understanding of art.

Influencing artists: Hergé, Brett Whiteley, Bill Watterson, Feng Zikai, Noel McKenna, Patrick Caulfield

Image attribution: Jackson Pollock Number 11, 1952 (Blue Poles) 1952 © Jackson Pollock, licensed by Viscopy, 2015. Edward Hopper Nighthawks 1942, Georges Seurat A Sunday on La Grande Jatte — 1884 1884-86 and Katsushika Hokusai The Great Wave off Kanagawa (Kanagawa oki nami ura) from the series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (Fugaku sanjurokkei) c1830/33, The Art Institute of Chicago. Brett Whiteley Self portrait in the studio 1976 and The Turquoise Prince date unknown © Wendy Whiteley. James Rosenquist F-111 1964-5 © James Rosenquist/VAGA, licensed by Viscopy, 2015. Caspar David Friedrich Wanderer above the Sea of Fog 1817 © Hamburger Kunsthalle/bpk, photo Elke Walford. René Magritte The Castle of the Pyrenees 1959 © René Magritte. Licensed by Viscopy, 2015

See also ARTEXPRESS 2015 Story Sphere


Collection connections

The narrative often lies in the objects portrayed in an artwork. How do the objects in Li-Hsien Lee’s body of work and Brett Whiteley’s Self portrait in the studio convey meaning? What are the postmodern elements of each work?

What objects would you include in a self-portrait to indicate to the viewer who you really are?