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Title

Fashion study

1937

Artist

John Rawlings

United States of America

1912 – 1970

No image
  • Details

    Date
    1937
    Media category
    Photograph
    Materials used
    gelatin silver photograph, vintage
    Dimensions
    24.5 x 18.8 cm image; 35.5 x 27.9 cm board
    Signature & date

    Signed l.r. board, pencil "Rawlings". Dated verso, pencil "1937 Sept".

    Credit
    Gift of Edron Pty Ltd - 1996 through the auspices of Alistair McAlpine
    Location
    Not on display
    Accession number
    910.1996
    Copyright
    © Estate of John Rawlings
    Artist information
    John Rawlings

    Works in the collection

    1

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  • About

    Like many fashion photographers, John Rawlings received his training in the ‘Vogue’ studios, where he was schooled in the style of its star photographers – George Von Hoyningen-Huene, Horst P Horst and Cecil Beaton. Born in Ohio, Rawlings started out as a window dresser in Manhattan in the early 1930s. He used a 35mm camera to document his displays, and also took candid shots of well-dressed socialites, which brought him to the attention of ‘Vogue’s’ publisher, Condé Nast. Rawlings joined ‘Vogue’s’ New York studio in 1936, before being dispatched to London to open and direct the first photographic studio for British ‘Vogue’ in 1937. Rawlings continued to work for Vogue throughout the war, responding to the changes in fashion and lifestyle wrought by rationing and austerity with a new style of photography that was felt to be distinctly American – fresh, uncluttered and dynamic.

    The dramatic lighting, mannered pose, studio location and fine detailing of rich textures in Rawling’s ‘Fashion study’ reveal the lingering influence of his apprenticeship with the great fashion photographers of the 1930s. The model is the Japanese–American dancer, Sono Osato, who danced with the Ballet Russe in Monte Carlo in the 1930s and in Broadway musicals in the 1940s. Osato models a ruched velvet evening dress, the heavy contours of which contrast with the delicacy of the sequinned veil she draws over her head. Her pose suggests the graceful development of a dance step, caught mid-action, and so she appears sinuously poised between dance and display.

    © Art Gallery of New South Wales Photography Collection Handbook, 2007

  • Exhibition history

    Shown in 1 exhibition

  • Bibliography

    Referenced in 2 publications