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Title

Woonggool

2010

Artist

Mabel Juli

Australia

circa 1931 –

Language group: Gija, Kimberley region

  • Details

    Date
    2010
    Media category
    Painting
    Materials used
    natural pigments on composite board
    Dimensions
    80.0 x 122.0 cm
    Credit
    Purchased with funds provided by the Aboriginal Art Collection Benefactors 2010
    Location
    Yiribana Gallery
    Accession number
    511.2010
    Copyright
    © Mabel Juli, courtesy Warmun Art Centre/Copyright Agency

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    Artist information
    Mabel Juli

    Works in the collection

    5

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  • About

    In 2010, when invited to participate in a program at the Art Gallery, Gija artists working through Warmun Art Centre in Western Australia decided to perform the Junba, broadly known as the Gurrir Gurrir, in Sydney for the first time. Patrick Mung Mung, Mabel Juli and the late Phyllis Thomas and Betty Carrington led the performers who enacted the Junba over three consecutive days. This work was among those used within the performance, being carried on the shoulders of the performers at specific moments in the narrative.
    The Gurirr Gurirr was originally conceived of by artist Rover Thomas in the mid 1970s following a series of dream visitations by the spirit of an elderly woman who had passed away as a result of a car accident on flooded roads near Warmun caused by Cyclone Tracy. The events relating to the return of the woman’s spirit to the East
    Kimberley and the spirits and sites she encountered were ‘given’ to Thomas. These episodes were then translated or interpreted into a Junba by Thomas and senior Gija artists Paddy Jaminji and George Mung Mung. Painted boards revealed at key points were, and remain, central to the Junba.
    This work refers to the snake that grabbed the car and pulled it down an embankment where the road crosses the little creek called Woonggool which is to the south of Warmun.

  • Exhibition history

    Shown in 1 exhibition

Other works by Mabel Juli

See all 5 works