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Title

Nō theatre costume

circa 1800

Artists

Unknown Artist

  • Details

    Other Title
    Noh theatre costume
    Place where the work was made
    Japan
    Period
    Edo (Tokugawa) period 1615 - 1868 → Japan
    Date
    circa 1800
    Media category
    Textile
    Materials used
    silk and gold; ikat dyed threads for the warp; brocade weave using flat strips of gilt paper
    Dimensions
    134.5 x 137.0 cm
    Credit
    Purchased with funds provided by the VisAsia Dinner Fund to commemorate the 'Goddess: Divine Energy' exhibition 2006
    Location
    Not on display
    Accession number
    286.2006
    Copyright

    Reproduction requests

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  • About

    Nō is a stylised dance-drama in which actors wear elaborate costumes and wooden masks. In contrast to kabuki which began as street entertainment, nō has its origins in temple ritual and has long been considered an aristocratic art form, enjoyed by shogunate and samurai nobility. Nō robes reflect the rich clothing of its traditional warrior-class patrons and are produced using expensive materials and complex techniques. With its vibrant design of expressive dragons in roundels against a stylised tortoiseshell pattern ‘bishamon-kikkō’ and fluid whirlpool ‘uzumaki’ motifs, this robe would most likely have been worn as an outer garment by an actor playing a male role.

  • Places

    Where the work was made

    Japan

  • Exhibition history

    Shown in 3 exhibitions

  • Bibliography

    Referenced in 3 publications