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Title

The moon's invention - Hōzō temple , from the series One hundred aspects of the moon

June 1891

Artist

Tsukioka Yoshitoshi

Japan

1839 - 1892

  • Details

    Alternative title
    tsuki no hatsumei - Hōzōin
    Place where the work was made
    Japan
    Period
    Meiji period 1868 - 1912 → Japan
    Date
    June 1891
    Media category
    Print
    Materials used
    colour woodblock; ōban
    Dimensions
    39.0 x 26.0 cm
    Signature & date

    Signed and dated.

    Credit
    Yasuko Myer Bequest Fund 2012
    Location
    Not on display
    Accession number
    258.2012.95
    Copyright

    Reproduction requests

    Artist information
    Tsukioka Yoshitoshi

    Works in the collection

    119

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  • About

    The head priest of Hōzōin Buddhist temple in Nara was Kakuzenbō Hōin In’ei, who came from a line of 'kuge', lords attached to the imperial court. By the second half of the 16th century he had established a fencing school at the temple. Here, he looks into water at the reflection of the moon. Interestingly, the crescent moon in the sky looks to be a cross piece in the practice fencing spear he is holding in his hand. This could be an allusion to a spear In’ei created called kamayari (sickle-spear; also seen in 258.2012.23) that has a very sharp cross piece, which was a famous development at the time. In’ei eventually came to the realisation his Buddhist beliefs were inconsistent with his martial art practice and gave away his weapons.

  • Places

    Where the work was made

    Japan

  • Exhibition history

    Shown in 1 exhibition

  • Bibliography

    Referenced in 3 publications

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