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Title

Covered jar (kamcheng)

19th century-20th century

Artist

Nonya ware

China

Alternate image of Covered jar (kamcheng) by Nonya ware
Alternate image of Covered jar (kamcheng) by Nonya ware
Alternate image of Covered jar (kamcheng) by Nonya ware
Alternate image of Covered jar (kamcheng) by Nonya ware
Alternate image of Covered jar (kamcheng) by Nonya ware
Alternate image of Covered jar (kamcheng) by Nonya ware
  • Details

    Place where the work was made
    Jingdezhen Jiangxi Province China
    Date
    19th century-20th century
    Media category
    Ceramic
    Materials used
    porcelain with enamel decoration
    Dimensions
    30.0 cm diam. of mouth; 31.5 x 37.0 cm :

    a - lid, 12 x 35 cm

    b - base, 21.8 x 37 cm

    Signature & date

    Not signed. Not dated.

    Credit
    Gift of Michael Gleeson-White 1988
    Location
    Lower Asian gallery
    Accession number
    160.1988.a-b
    Copyright

    Reproduction requests

    Artist information
    Nonya ware

    Works in the collection

    7

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  • About

    'Kamcheng' is a Hokkien word meaning 'covered jar'. A 'kamcheng' was variously used as a container for water, pickles and other types of food. China exported a large number of these ceramics to the Straits Settlements communities in Penang, Malacca and Singapore in the 1800s, where a distinct culture evolved known by the Malay word 'peranakan', which describes those who were born locally, whether they be Chinese, Indian, Arab, Indonesian or another. The word Baba describes specifically Straights-born Chinese men, while the term Nonya is used for the women, and it is this latter term that has been adopted to describe the Chinese ceramics made at Jingdezhen to the order of Straits Chinese from the 1850s to the early 1900s. The wares were of two types: richly decorated enamel wares for use on auspicious occasions, and functional blue-and-white wares for everyday use.

    The Asian Collections, AGNSW, 2003, pg.145.

  • Places

    Where the work was made

    Jingdezhen

  • Exhibition history

    Shown in 1 exhibition

    • The Way We Eat, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 03 Apr 2021–2022

  • Bibliography

    Referenced in 2 publications

Other works by Nonya ware

See all 7 works