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Title

Set of eighteen offering goddesses

19th century

Artist

Unknown

Tibet

Alternate image of Set of eighteen offering goddesses by Unknown
Alternate image of Set of eighteen offering goddesses by Unknown
Alternate image of Set of eighteen offering goddesses by Unknown
Alternate image of Set of eighteen offering goddesses by Unknown
Alternate image of Set of eighteen offering goddesses by Unknown
Alternate image of Set of eighteen offering goddesses by Unknown
Alternate image of Set of eighteen offering goddesses by Unknown
Alternate image of Set of eighteen offering goddesses by Unknown
Alternate image of Set of eighteen offering goddesses by Unknown
Alternate image of Set of eighteen offering goddesses by Unknown
Alternate image of Set of eighteen offering goddesses by Unknown
Alternate image of Set of eighteen offering goddesses by Unknown
Alternate image of Set of eighteen offering goddesses by Unknown
Alternate image of Set of eighteen offering goddesses by Unknown
Alternate image of Set of eighteen offering goddesses by Unknown
Alternate image of Set of eighteen offering goddesses by Unknown
Alternate image of Set of eighteen offering goddesses by Unknown
Alternate image of Set of eighteen offering goddesses by Unknown
  • Details

    Other Title
    Offering goddess
    Place where the work was made
    Southern Tibet Tibet
    Date
    19th century
    Media category
    Painting
    Materials used
    gouache on cotton
    Dimensions
    10.5 x 8.0 cm each painting
    Signature & date

    Not signed. Not dated.

    Credit
    Purchased 2000
    Location
    Not on display
    Accession number
    16.2000.a-r
    Copyright

    Reproduction requests

    Artist information
    Unknown

    Works in the collection

    5

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  • About

    Painted initiation cards known as tsakali are unique to Tibet. Usually rendered in sets, the cards form mandalas (sacred diagrams) and are used as meditation aids, in transmission of teachings, in funerary rites and substitutes for ritual objects when they are difficult to obtain.

    This tsakali most likely belonged to three different sets. The offering goddesses proffer music, flowers, water, incense, fruit, cloth and other substances typically used in ritual. The birth of a Buddha heralds the onset of the seven treasures: queen, minister, general, wheel, jewel, elephant and horse. The treasures symbolise faith, morality, honesty, modesty, learning, renunciation and wisdom.

    Asian Art Department, AGNSW, 2008

  • Bibliography

    Referenced in 3 publications

    • Ann Macarthur, Look, "Goddesses', pg. 39, Sydney, Dec 2005-Jan 2006, 39 (colour illus.). The colour illus. on page 39 shows (from left to right) parts q, l, e, and m of this work.

    • P. Pal., Tibet: Tradition and Change, 'Four Miniature Paintings', Albuquerque, 1998, 195, 277. General reference; see plates 97 a-d in article by P. Pal for comparable pieces.

    • Pratapaditya Pal, The art of Tibet, New York, 1969, 52. General reference; see page 52 for comparable piece.

Other works by Unknown

See all 5 works