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Title

Man’s jacket (haori)

1920s-1930s

Artists

Unknown Artist

  • Details

    Place where the work was made
    Japan
    Period
    Taishô period 1912 - 1926 → Japan
    Date
    1920s-1930s
    Media category
    Textile
    Materials used
    silk; resist dyeing
    Dimensions
    120.0 x 160.0 cm
    Credit
    Asian Collection Benefactors 2019
    Location
    Not on display
    Accession number
    145.2019
    Copyright

    Reproduction requests

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  • About

    In the 1920s and 30s skeletons and skulls were a fashionable design choice to adorn the robes worn under kimonos, as well as for the linings of jackets (haori). Most of these garments were worn by men who would show them off in private settings. Skeleton and skull motifs had been prevalent in Japanese art, particularly Buddhist art, for centuries, but in the Taisho and early Showa periods they were also part of a modern trend in experimental designs on clothing which also included propaganda depictions of warplanes, battleships and submarines.

  • Places

    Where the work was made

    Japan

  • Exhibition history

    Shown in 2 exhibitions

    • Supernatural, Galerie Mingei Japanese arts, Paris, 11 Sep 2018–29 Sep 2018

    • Japan Supernatural, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 02 Nov 2019–08 Mar 2020

  • Bibliography

    Referenced in 1 publication

    • Philippe Boudin and Zoe Niang (Directors), Supernatural, Paris, 18 (colour illus.).