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Title

Amitabha Buddha

late 8th century-mid 9th century


Artists

Unknown Artist


About

This monumental stone image of the seated Buddha Amitabha, the Buddha of the West, sits with his hands held in the meditation gesture (in Sanskrit known as 'dhyana mudra'), his feet in the 'vajrasana' position of both soles upwards, and wearing the thin diaphanous robe of a monk. Deeply immersed in meditation, the Buddha emanates the serenity, wisdom and spirituality expected of the central icon of Buddhism. It is likely that originally this Buddha was part of a specific grouping. For example, Amitabha, together with Shakyamuni, the Historical Buddha, and Maitreya, the Buddha of the Future, constitutes the powerful triumvirate of Past, Present and Future Buddhas. As well, Amitabha as the Buddha of the West, appears in mandalas on the western quarter.

The concept of the mandala, a diagrammatic representation of the invisible forces that govern the cosmos, was brought to Indonesia with Vajrayana Buddhism. Vajrayana mandalas commonly have five Buddhas: the Buddhas of the Four Directions, presided over by Vairochana, the Buddha of the Centre. The largest three-dimensional mandala, and a site of world cultural significance, is at Borobudur, an astounding 9th century monument that contains nearly 500 Buddhist statues. Stylistically this Buddha is close to those at Borobudur, and presumably belonged to such a set that once constituted a temple mandala, with Amitabha Buddhas presiding over the west.

The Asian Collections, AGNSW, 2003, pg.339.


Details


Place where the work was made

Central Java Java Indonesia


Date

late 8th century-mid 9th century


Media category

Sculpture


Materials used

andesite


Dimensions

105.0 x 88.0 x 65.0 cm


Signature & date

Not signed. Not dated.


Credit

Purchased with funds provided by the Art Gallery Society of New South Wales 2000


Location

Not on display


Accession number

144.2000



Place

Where the work was made
Central Java

Shown in 3 exhibitions

Exhibition history