Skip to content

Update from the Gallery regarding COVID-19

The Art Gallery of New South Wales is open. We are observing strict physical distancing and hygiene measures to protect the health of visitors and staff and minimise the spread of COVID-19 (coronavirus). Read the latest visit information, including hours

Collection

All

Search

Asian art

View More:


Title

Skirt cloth (sampot hol)

1900-1950


Artists

Unknown Artist


About

This fine silk skirt cloth (sampot) was part of daily clothing in Cambodia in the first half of the 20th century. It was created by women using an intricate resist dyed patterning technique known in Khmer (Cambodian) as hol but more widely referred to as ikat. In this technique complex designs are tied and dyed into the silk before weaving.

The textile displays three clear areas of patterning – a large central field surrounded by mirrored panels at either end and simple designs along each side. While the pattern placement derives from treasured Indian patola cloths traded to Southeast Asia from Gujarat since at least the 15th century, the destinctive design is identifiably Cambodian. Silk textiles of this style appear in Cambodian temple paintings and similar cloths appear on Khmer sculptures of the 12th and 13th centuries.


Details


Place where the work was made

Cambodia


Cultural origin

Khmer people


Date

1900-1950


Media category

Textile


Materials used

silk, natural dyes; weft resist dyeing (hol), twill weaving


Dimensions

90.0 290.0 cm approx.


Credit

Gift of Ross Forman 2020


Location

Not on display


Accession number

143.2020



Place

Where the work was made
Cambodia