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Title

To the sea

2009

Artist

Igawa Takeshi

Japan

1980 –

Alternate image of To the sea by Igawa Takeshi
Alternate image of To the sea by Igawa Takeshi
Alternate image of To the sea by Igawa Takeshi
Alternate image of To the sea by Igawa Takeshi
Alternate image of To the sea by Igawa Takeshi
Alternate image of To the sea by Igawa Takeshi
Alternate image of To the sea by Igawa Takeshi
Alternate image of To the sea by Igawa Takeshi
Alternate image of To the sea by Igawa Takeshi
Alternate image of To the sea by Igawa Takeshi
  • Details

    Place where the work was made
    Japan
    Date
    2009
    Media category
    Lacquerware
    Materials used
    lacquer and hemp cloth on polyurethane ('kanshitsu')
    Dimensions
    168.0 x 35.0 x 22.0 cm
    Credit
    Gift of Lesley Kehoe 2020
    Location
    Not on display
    Accession number
    124.2020
    Copyright
    © Igawa Takeshi

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    Artist information
    Igawa Takeshi

    Works in the collection

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  • About

    Igawa Takeshi first became interested in woodworking when he was an undergraduate at the Kyoto City University of the Arts in 2003. By 2008 his interest in lacquer (urushi) had developed and he wrote his PhD dissertation about the complex use of lacquer coating. Igawa is inspired by the sky and sea, exploring how the mercurial qualities of these subjects can be expressed in lacquer. His works regularly resemble steel blades and he consciously uses light and shadow to create imposing formations.

    At 1.7m long, this minimalist lacquer sculpture is among the artist’s most dramatic. In To the sea Igawa has created a form and reflective surface that produces shadows, giving the illusion of rolling waves. The traditional Japanese lacquer technique kanshitsu involves applying several coats of lacquer on multiple layers of hemp cloth over a wooden substrate. The historical approach is further developed by Igawa who instead uses polyurethane as the substrate, allowing him to create large contemporary sculptures.

  • Places

    Where the work was made

    Japan