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Title

And awe was all that we could feel , from the series And awe was all that we could feel

1978-1980
printed 2020

Artist

Helen Grace

Australia

1949 –

No image
  • Details

    Dates
    1978-1980
    printed 2020
    Media category
    Photograph
    Materials used
    12 gelatin silver photographs
    Edition
    1/5
    Dimensions
    display dimensions variable :

    a - And awe was all that we could feel 1, 38.5 x 56.5 cm, 1978 {printed later} 2020 {printed}

    a - And awe was all that we could feel 1, 44 x 62.2 cm

    b - And awe was all that we could feel 2, 38.5 x 56.5 cm, 1978 {printed later} 2020 {printed}

    b - And awe was all that we could feel 2, 44 x 62.2 cm

    c - And awe was all that we could feel 3, 38.5 x 56.5 cm, 1978 {printed later} 2020 {printed}

    c - And awe was all that we could feel 3, 44 x 62.2 cm

    d - And awe was all that we could feel 4, 38.5 x 56.5 cm, 1978 {printed later} 2020 {printed}

    d - And awe was all that we could feel 4, 44 x 62.2 cm

    e - And awe was all that we could feel 5, 38.5 x 56.5 cm, 1978 {printed later} 2020 {printed}

    e - And awe was all that we could feel 5, 44 x 62.2 cm

    f - And awe was all that we could feel 6, 38.5 x 56.5 cm, 1978 {printed later} 2020 {printed}

    f - And awe was all that we could feel 6, 44 x 62.2 cm

    g - And awe was all that we could feel 7, 38.5 x 56.5 cm, 1978 {printed later} 2020 {printed}

    g - And awe was all that we could feel 7, 44 x 62.2 cm

    h - And awe was all that we could feel 8, 38.5 x 56.5 cm, 1979 {printed later} 2020 {printed}

    h - And awe was all that we could feel 8, 44 x 62.2 cm

    i - And awe was all that we could feel 9, 38.5 x 56.5 cm, 1979 {printed later} 2020 {printed}

    i - And awe was all that we could feel 9, 44 x 62.2 cm

    j - And awe was all that we could feel 10, 38.5 x 56.5 cm, 1980 {printed later} 2020 {printed}

    j - And awe was all that we could feel 10, 44 x 62.2 cm

    k - And awe was all that we could feel 11, 38.5 x 56.5 cm, 1980 {printed later} 2020 {printed}

    k - And awe was all that we could feel 11, 44 x 62.2 cm

    l - And awe was all that we could feel 12, 38.5 x 56.5 cm, 1980 {printed later} 2020 {printed}

    l - And awe was all that we could feel 12, 44 x 62.2 cm

    Signature & date

    Not signed. Not dated.

    Credit
    Purchased with funds provided by the Photography Collection Benefactors 2021
    Location
    Not on display
    Accession number
    12.2021.a-l
    Copyright
    © Helen Grace
    Artist information
    Helen Grace

    Works in the collection

    3

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  • About

    Helen Grace’s documentary photography constitutes a critical archive. For more than 40 years, Grace has been recording the social and political fabric of her surrounds. The history her photographs trace is the history of feminism and queer politics in Australia. This series is from the body of work Grace produced during the early days of Amazon Acres, a remote female-only commune in northern NSW. Shot during different visits in 1978, 1979 and 1980, the photographs memorialise an important, and often under-recognised, cultural moment. Amazon Acres, also known as The Mountain, was established in 1974 by Kerryn Higgs. It was an experiment in alternative social structure, its spirit encapsulated by the slogan ‘No men, no meat, no machines’. Utopic in its ideal, it was grounded in anti-capitalist sentiment and modelled as a sanctuary for women.

    Grace’s photographs are resonant political documents that carry the commune’s ideological incentive but also confer the intimate sense of community it fostered. This sequence, its title taken from an Emily Dickinson poem, has been concieved as a storyboard. It is cinematic in its intent; it opens with an establishing shot and alternates throughout between tight close-ups and landscape scenes. The commune’s hand-made structures are shown in their raw state, and its inhabitants go about their day as if unaware of the camera’s presence. We catch tender moments, the quiet rhythms of everyday life set against the monumental task of building a community from scratch. There is little sense of voyeurism here. Grace is not an outsider, she is herself part of the community. The photographs, then, appear to us – 40 years after they were taken – as an honest and poignant record.

  • Exhibition history

    Shown in 1 exhibition

Other works by Helen Grace