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Art Sets.

Wynne Prize 2021: children’s labels

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By the Art Gallery of NSW
AGNSW prizes Nyapanyapa Yunupiŋu Garak – night sky, from Wynne Prize 2021

AGNSW prizes Nyapanyapa Yunupiŋu Garak – night sky, from Wynne Prize 2021

Have you ever gazed up at the stars in the night sky?

The stars in this large painting emerge from the darkness in dazzling bursts of white. It tells the story of the Seven Sisters and their journey to Rocky Bay in eastern Arnhem Land. Nyapanyapa Yunupiŋu has depicted the the Seven Sisters as stars within the night sky. Notice the many layers of sparkling stars and the energy they create.

Which stars stand out the most?

AGNSW prizes Leah Brady Piltati tjukurpa, from Wynne Prize 2021

AGNSW prizes Leah Brady Piltati tjukurpa, from Wynne Prize 2021

Look at all the lines, circles and contours in this landscape.

Leah Brady has painted the tjukurpa (story) connected to Piltati, about two snake brothers and their wives. The lines, squiggling shapes and marks show their journey through their country in South Australia. Describe the colours you can see and what the features of this landscape might look like.

Move your hand and arm like a snake following the lines and contours of the landscape.

AGNSW prizes Tracey Deep Tree spirit, from Wynne Prize 2021

AGNSW prizes Tracey Deep Tree spirit, from Wynne Prize 2021

Walk around this artwork. Which viewpoint do you prefer?

Tracey Deep has combined banksia tree branches and wooden sticks to create an interwoven sculpture. Tracey found the branches after the bushfires of 2020. Look at how the burnt branches contrast with the lighter coloured sticks. The sticks twist and turn through and over the branches as if they are dancing between them.

Imagine what music would suit their dancing motion and move your whole body to mimic the rhythm of the sculpture.

AGNSW prizes Julianne Ross Allcorn Thesaurium insula (treasured island), from Wynne Prize 2021

AGNSW prizes Julianne Ross Allcorn Thesaurium insula (treasured island), from Wynne Prize 2021

How many different creatures can you spot hidden in this landscape?

The closer you look, the more creatures you can see emerging from the plants, trees and water. Painted across 12 wooden panels, this rich habitat of animals and plants celebrates the diversity of nature in Australia. Julianne Ross Allcorn wants us to think about how we should treasure our wildlife and what we can do to protect it.

If you were to create an artwork of your favourite Australian animals what would you draw or paint?

AGNSW prizes Peter Mungkuri Ngayuku ngura (my country), from Wynne Prize 2021

AGNSW prizes Peter Mungkuri Ngayuku ngura (my country), from Wynne Prize 2021

How many trees can you see in this painting?

Trees are an important symbol of Aṉangu culture. As a boy, Peter Mungkuri would sit and watch his father making spears and other tools from the trees that grew in his part of the country. Look at the energy and detail in this painting. Watery ink swirls through the landscape and the details of the trees and their leaves.

Describe the different lines and textures. How do you think Peter applied the ink and paint to the painting?

AGNSW prizes Guy Maestri The flood, from Wynne Prize 2021

AGNSW prizes Guy Maestri The flood, from Wynne Prize 2021

Have you ever painted something from memory?

Guy Maestri painted this landscape while remembering the floods he experienced as a child. Look at the river as it flows through the landscape with a swirling force. Notice the lush colours of the trees and plants. Thick paint and bold shapes create the features of the landscape as it bursts back to life after the heavy rainfall.

What types of painting tools do you think Guy used to make this artwork?

AGNSW prizes Yaritji Young Tjala tjukurpa (honey ant story), from Wynne Prize 2021

AGNSW prizes Yaritji Young Tjala tjukurpa (honey ant story), from Wynne Prize 2021

This colourful artwork shows the rock holes and landmarks of Yaritji Young’s country in the Aṉangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) lands in South Australia. The lines, marks and shapes follow the tunnels and formations made by tjala (honey ants). Find one line and follow it through the painting with your eyes. How far did you get? How many times did the line change direction?

Try following some more. How easy is it to follow the lines?

AGNSW prizes Luke Sciberras Hat Hill Road, from Wynne Prize 2021

AGNSW prizes Luke Sciberras Hat Hill Road, from Wynne Prize 2021

Describe what you can see in this landscape painting.

Luke Sciberras has used bold brushmarks and contrasting colours to paint some waratah flowers he saw in a friend’s garden in the Blue Mountains. Their vibrant red petals stand out against the soft pink of the sandstone rocks. Notice how we can’t see the horizon or sky in this landscape, so we feel like we are completely surrounded by nature.

If you could step into this landscape, what temperature do you think it would be? What would you hear?