Skip to content

Summer at the Gallery 2010-11

Five major exhibitions and associated events to enjoy

Justin O’Brien The dancer c1946, SH Ervin Gallery, Sydney. Alan Renshaw Bequest. © Estate of Justin O’Brien. Detail of standing light infantryman in Pit 1 © The Museum of Qin Shihuang’s Terracotta Warriors and Horses.

The First Emperor: China’s entombed warriors

until 13 March 2011

One of the world’s greatest archaeological discoveries of the 20th century was the discovery of the terracotta army who protected the tomb of China’s first emperor (221–210 BCE). This magnificent exhibition of some 100 objects includes ten of the world-famous life-size warriors from Xi’an: terracotta figures of foot soldiers, generals, kneeling bowmen, cavalry and chariot horses. The works are on loan from institutions in Shaanxi province including the Museum of Terracotta Warriors and Horses of Emperor Qin Shihuang.

Late opening

From 8 January, the exhibition will be open on Saturday nights until 8pm.

Justin O’Brien: the sacred music of colour

until 27 February 2011

This is the first major retrospective of Justin O’Brien’s work since 1987 and the first since his death in 1996. Surveying the artist’s complete oeuvre – and incorporating around 100 paintings and works on paper from seven decades of image making – this exhibition endeavours to liberate O’Brien from the erroneous perception that he was merely an illustrator of religious themes of the modern era. The exquisite and sumptuous detail of his still lifes, portraits and works depicting religious narratives attest to O’Brien’s inventive brilliance and commanding use of colour and form, and reveal the artist’s wide-ranging knowledge of art history and literature, sources for his unique exploration of the human condition.

art + soul

until 13 June 2011

art + soul explores the diversity of Indigenous culture through three themes: ‘home and away’, ‘dreams and nightmares’ and ‘bitter and sweet’. Drawing on key works from the Gallery’s collection, it reveals the myriad contemporary artistic expressions that evidence the enduring heritage of Indigenous Australia, in all its diversity and complexity.

Dobell Prize for Drawing

until 30 January 2011

The Dobell Prize is the most respected award for drawing in Australia. Initiated by the trustees of the Sir William Dobell Art Foundation, the prize was first awarded in 1993. The winner now receives $25,000. This year there are 45 works, including the winning work by Suzanne Archer, Derangement.

The Indian Empire: multiple realities

until 3 January 2011

This extensive exhibition, comprising prints, photographs, posters and textiles, includes images of the India of the European imagination together with images created under the patronage of foreigners overwhelmed by a totally different country and culture. Such images favoured portraits, depictions of the manners, customs and costumes of the Indian people, as well as topographical prints in the ‘picturesque’ style then in vogue in England.

Programs over summer

Media contact

Susanne Briggs
Tel +61 2 9225 1791
Mob 0412 268 320
susanne.briggs@ag.nsw.gov.au