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Collection

Mäw Mununggurr

(Australia circa 1910 – 1976)

Language group
Djapu, Arnhem region
Title
The Morning Star ceremony
Place of origin
Blue Mud BayNorth-east Arnhem LandNorthern TerritoryAustralia
Year
circa 1960
Media category
Bark painting
Materials used
natural pigments on bark
Dimensions

120.6 x 64.2 cm (irreg.)

Signature & date
Not signed. Not dated.
Credit
Gift of Dr Stuart Scougall 1960
Accession number
IA37.1960
Copyright
© Estate of Mäu' Mununggurr
Location
Not on display
Further information

Mäw' Mununggurr's life spanned a crucial era in the history of the Yolngu people of north-east Arnhem Land. He was one of the older sons of Wonggu Mununggurr (c.1880-1959), the famous Djapu clan leader who led resistance to incursions on his land before the establishment of the Methodist Yirrkala Mission in 1935. Mäw' was imprisoned for a year in Fannie Bay Gaol in Darwin following a skirmish at Caledon Bay in 1933 in which the crew of a Japanese pearling boat were killed. During World War II he was a member of Donald Thomson's Aboriginal observer force, patrolling the shores of Arnhem Land looking for any signs of Japanese invasion. Wonggu, in collaboration with his older sons including Mäw', painted for Thomson an enormous bark painting of the main settlement site, 'Wandawuy: Wet season painting', 1942, now in the Melbourne Museum.

After the war, Mäw' settled at Yirrkala, making frequent visits to his country around Caledon Bay and Trial Bay. He was a prolific painter, producing works for anthropologists Ronald and Catherine Berndt in 1946 and 1947, and for Charles Mountford's American-Australian Scientific Expedition to Arnhem Land in 1948. Mäw' produced bark paintings throughout his life, and during his final years he worked intensely to help his clan establish Wandawuy. Painting for sale was only a minor part of his artistic output. Mäw' was a great singer, dancer and ceremonial leader, and was frequently called upon to produce paintings of his own clan and his mother's clan in ceremonies. He was a leader of the spectacular 'Dhanbul (Morning Star)' exchange ceremony which he depicts in 'Banumbirr (Morning Star ceremony)', 1948, and 'The Morning Star ceremony', c.1960 – and took it to Groote Eylandt and Numbulwarr.

Mäw's style of painting is often reserved. Many of his early paintings comprise multiple figurative representations of fish and animals, with broad areas of crosshatching in a single colour. These paintings were in continuity with some of the earlier Yolngu barks representing daily scenes that were among the first produced for the Rev. Wilbur Chaseling, who established Yirrkala Mission. Towards the end of his life, Mäw's paintings emphasised the story of Mana, the Djapu shark, and the shark itself often provided the dominant image. He also continued to create the paintings of his mother's clan, the Munyuku, and related Yirritja moiety clans.

Howard Morphy in 'Tradition today: Indigenous art in Australia', Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 2004

© Art Gallery of New South Wales

Bibliography (3)

Edmund Capon, Steven Miller, Tony Tuckson, James Scougall, Mollie Gowing, Harry Messel, Craig Brush, Ronald Fine, Alison Fine, Gordon Davies, Rosalind Davies, Christopher Hodges, Helen Eager, Rosemary Gow, Sandra Phillips, Daphne Wallace and Ken Watson, Gamarada, Sydney, 1996, 34 (colour illus.).

Howard Morphy, Tradition today: Indigenous art in Australia, 'Mäw' Mununggurr', pg. 96, Sydney, 2004, 96 (colour illus., left image).

Margo Neale, Yiribana: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander collection, Sydney, 1994, 88, 89 (colour illus), 137, 139. plate no. 40

Exhibition history (2)

Purchases and Acquisitions for 1960, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 22 Mar 1961–23 Apr 1961

Gamarada, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 15 Nov 1996–16 Feb 1997