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Collection

DING Yanyong

(China 1902 – 1978)

Title
Birds, flower, leaves and figure
Other titles:
Birds, flower and figure
Place of origin
China
Year
20th century
Media category
Painting
Materials used
9 album leaves ink on paper; 1 ink and colour on paper
Dimensions

a - figure; 35 x 34.6 cm

b - beetle/leaves; 34 x 33.5 cm

c - sparrow; 35 x 33.6 cm

d - 2 swallows; 34.5 x 33.5 cm

e - 3 sparrows; 34.8 x 34.6 cm

f - 3 chickens (colour); 34.3 x 33.6 cm

g - fish; 34.1 x 33.9 cm

h - cicada/flower; 34.8 x 34.5 cm

i - round man; 34.6 x 34.2 cm

j - squirrel; 34.1 x 34.4 cm

Signature & date
a. Signed u.r., in Chinese, inscribed in black ink. Not dated. b. Signed u.l., in Chinese, inscribed in black ink. Not dated. c. Signed l.r., in Chinese, inscribed in black ink. Not dated. d. Signed and titled u.l., in Chinese, inscribed in black ink. Not dated. e. Signed and titled l.r., in Chinese, inscribed in black ink. Not dated. f. Signed l.r., in Chinese, inscribed in black ink. Not dated. g. Signed u.r., in Chinese, inscribed in black ink. Not dated. h. Signed l.r., in Chinese, inscribed in black ink. Not dated. i. Signed and titled u.r, in Chinese, inscribed in black ink. Not dated. j. Signed l.r., in Chinese, inscribed in black ink "…Ding Yangyong". Not dated. Signed l.r. corner, in Chinese, stamped in red ink " Ding [artist's seal]"
Credit
Purchased 1985
Accession number
83.1985.a-j
Location
Not on display
Further information

Born of a wealthy family in Gaozhou, Guangdong Province, he completed his secondary education and then went to the Tokyo Academy of Art from which he graduated when 23. His early works show much western influence, but by the early 1930s he had abandoned his interest in Western painting to devote himself to Chinese ink painting, feeling that, in his own words 'Chinese art is superior (to Western art) in the sense that its artistic expressions are limitless - because it is not tied to any exterior form.' After the Sino-Japanese war of 1937-45, Ding became head of the reorganised Guangdong Provincial Art College.

In these seemingly effortless drawings, familiar subjects are treated with a delightful freshness and great economy. The sparseness of the compositions, the paring down to the absolutely essential, adds a keenness to our enjoyment of the sketches.

Asian Art Department, AGNSW, April 1985.

Bibliography (1)

Jackie Menzies, Art of the Brush - Chinese & Japanese painting calligraphy, Sydney, 1995, 14.

Exhibition history (2)

Art of the brush, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 23 Sep 1995–12 Nov 1995

Brushstrokes from Asia (1997), The Brett Whiteley Studio, Surry Hills, 25 Jan 1997–20 Apr 1997