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Title

'Jiao dou' tripod


Artists

Unknown Artist


About

As with most Han bronzes, this tripod utensil is marked with a simplicity and plainness at odds with the elaborately decorated ritual bronzes of the preceding Shang and Zhou dynasties. The dragon's head, as cast on the long handle, may not have had a deep religious meaning, serving instead as an auspicious symbol. The 'jiao dou' was a wine-warming utensil, examples of which have been found in archaeological contexts placed atop iron stoves.

Asian Art Department, AGNSW, January 2012


Details


Other Title

Tripod brazier (jiao dou)


Place where the work was made

China


Date

25 CE-220 CE


Media category

Metalwork


Materials used

bronze


Dimensions

12.0 x 15.4 cm bowl; 19.3 cm overall height


Credit

Gift of Mr F. Storch 1980


Location

Not on display


Accession number

8.1980



Place

Where the work was made
China

Shown in 2 exhibitions

Exhibition history


  • Early Chinese art, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 26 Feb 1983–08 May 1983

  • Dragon (2012), Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 18 Jan 2012–06 May 2012


Referenced in 2 publications

Bibliography


Jackie Menzies, Three years on: a selection of acquisitions 1978-1981, 'Asian Art', pg. 85-103, Sydney, 1981, 102 (illus.). cat.no. 33

Jackie Menzies, Early Chinese Art, Sydney, 1983, (illus.) not paginated. cat.no. XVIII. See 'Further Information' for text.