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Collection

Pangia, Southern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea

Title
Timbu wara
Other titles:
Timbuwara
Timbura
Female figure - Timbawara
Timbuwarra
Timbuwar
Place of origin
PangiaSouthern Highlands ProvincePapua New Guinea
Cultural origin
Wiru people
Year
collected 1967
Media categories
Ceremonial object, Weaving
Materials used
coil-woven rattan and plant fibre, carved wood, red and yellow ochres, white and blue pigments, 2-ply plant fibre string, sedge grass, iron nails
Dimensions

133.0 x 86.0 x 8.5 cm

Credit
Gift of Stan Moriarty 1977
Accession number
580.1979
Copyright
© Wiru people, under the endorsement of PIMA's 'Code of Ethics'
Location
Not on display
Further information

Flat woven anthropomorphic figures - known as timbu wara - from the Southern Highlands of Papua New Guinea were kept in spirit houses, conical-roofed structures built some distance from the village, and apparently were associated with fertility and spirits. In ceremony they were carried or were pinned to the tall red wig worn by men. This practice was locally described as 'female pinned by a penis to the wig'.

Collector Stanley Moriarty refers to it as a female figure representing a dead wife intended for relatives and friends to pay their respects.

Bibliography (1)

Chris Boylan and Greta North, The world of tribal arts, 'Highlands Art of New Guinea', pg. 73-83, San Francisco, Winter 1997, 83 (colour illus.). fig.no. 25