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Collection

An image of Motormouth by Callum Morton
Alternate image of Motormouth by Callum Morton Alternate image of Motormouth by Callum Morton

Callum Morton

(Canada, Australia 1965 – )

Title
Motormouth
Year
2002
Media categories
Time-based media, Installation
Materials used
polystyrene, wood, synthetic polymer paint, impact resistant polyurethane, acrylic, sound
Dimensions

overall dimensions variable according to room size:

a - highway half, upper ramp; 290 x 153 x 26 cm

b - highway half, upper ramp; 4310 x 153 x 26 cm

c - pylon, upper ramp; 283 x 90 x 10 cm

d - pylon, upper ramp; 283 x 90 x 10 cm

e - railing, front edge, upper ramp; 455.3 x 4 x 5.5 cm

f - railing, front edge, upper ramp; 59.7 x 4 x 5.5 cm

g - railing, front edge, upper ramp; 203 x 4 x 5.5 cm

h - railing, back edge, upper ramp; 302 x 4 x 5.5 cm

i - railing, back edge, upper ramp; 70.5 x 4 x 5.5 cm

j - highway half, lower ramp; 367 x 153 x 26 cm

k - highway half, lower ramp; 368 x 153 x 33 cm

l - pylon, lower ramp; 212 x 90 x 10 cm

m - pylon, lower ramp; 212 x 90 x 10 cm

n - pylon, lower ramp; 212 x 90 x 10 cm

o - street lamp, lower ramp; 106 x 44 x 4 cm

p - street lamp, lower ramp; 106 x 44 x 4 cm

q - railing, front edge, lower ramp; 384 x 4 x 5.5 cm

r - railing, front edge, lower ramp; 354 x 4 x 5.5 cm

s - railing, back edge, lower ramp; 355 x 4 x 5.5 cm

t - railing, back edge, lower ramp; 384 x 4 x 5.5 cm

Credit
Contemporary Collection Benefactors' 2002
Accession number
305.2002.a-u
Copyright
© Callum Morton, courtesy of the artist and RoslynOxley9 Gallery
Location
Not on display
Further information

Callum Morton’s sculptures combine incisive social observation, ideas about urban design and contemporary living, and an interest in the legacy of minimal sculpture. ‘Motormouth’ continues his consideration of the intersections between public and private space and in particular the ‘non-spaces’ of urban design such as freeways, shopping centres, service stations, cinemas and convenience stores. These are the generic buildings and sites that are designed as transit zones between destinations or as backdrops to their intended function. We don’t usually notice their architecture except as an indicator of this function. Morton’s sculptural versions reintroduce narratives that are at odds with the social design of these places and yet are somehow entirely appropriate for the setting.

‘Motormouth’ is a sculpture of two freeways, scaled 1:10 and perfect in detail down to the dirty realism of their distressed, water-stained concrete marked with graffiti. It appears to be a realistic model but is in fact an elaborate representation of what a generic freeway should look like rather than being a copy of an existing structure.

The freeways are raised on pylons above eye height, frustrating our desire to see what is on the superstructure, though logically it should only be scaled-down cars. Freeways are designed to move people efficiently and rapidly between city centres and satellite suburbs, from home to work, from boardroom to bedroom, or at the very least to get you across town in time for your meeting. They are the key people conduits of modern urban design and, as with other mid 20th-century projects, they had a progressive utopian agenda to make life more time efficient and productive. And on a good day they still do this. On others they are a battleground where the tensions between the private and public functions of cars and freeways erupt.

In ‘Motormouth’ you can hear the sound of a traffic jam on the lower freeway. Inevitably in the frustration at being kept waiting, anger boils over and conflict ensues. Cars are a private, personal zone in which we move through a public arena, one in which we feel empowered and in control. Despite the social contract that keeps us on the correct side of the road and heading in the same direction, in our car our rules count as we adjust the seats, the climate, the music, to create a pod between us and the world. However road rage is a rapidly growing social issue and while studies have come up with several interlocking reasons for this phenomenon, it seems to hinge on the tension between the collective rules we need to regulate cars, roads and driving and our rampant individualism. There is no doubt that contemporary city life is faster: we have more to do, so we don’t expect to be kept waiting. As the title puns, we are the inevitable product of our own social and technological designs.

© Art Gallery of New South Wales Contemporary Collection Handbook, 2006

Bibliography (8)

Wayne Tunnicliffe, Contemporary: Art Gallery of New South Wales Contemporary Collection, 'Reality bytes', pg.382-423, Sydney, 2006, 406, 407 (colour illus.).

Jill Sykes, Look, 'New on two', pg. 18-19, Newtown, Sep 2006, 19.

Art Gallery of New South Wales, Art Gallery of New South Wales Annual Report 2003, 'Year in review', pg.14-35, Sydney, 2003, 18.

Stuart Koop., Callum Morton: more talk about buildings and mood, 'The story of architecture', Sydney, 2003, n.pag. (colour illus.).

Connell Nisbet, Look, 'Acquisitive minds', pg. 23-27, Newtown, Dec 2003-Jan 2004, 27 (colour illus.).

Art Gallery of New South Wales, Art Gallery of New South Wales Annual Report 2002, Sydney, 2002, 19 (colour illus.).

Wayne Tunnicliffe, BitterSweet, Sydney, 2002, 8-9, 18-19 (colour illus.).

Alison Harper, Art and Australia (Vol. 41, No. 1), 'Recent museum acquisitions: contemporary art', pg. 114-117, St Leonards, Sep 2003-Nov 2003, 114 (colour illus.), 115.