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Title

Insignia badge for a noble


Artists

Unknown Artist


About

In the Ming and Qing dynasties the aristocracy as well as civil and military officials wore rank-defining badges on the front and back of their robes. The front-facing dragon would have been worn by a Prince of the Blood, who had been granted the right to wear the five-clawed creature by the emperor. The rich motifs include the rocks, the waves and the cloud representing the earth, the sea and the sky symbolising the universe, and the peony, bat and lingzhi (magical mushroom) symbolising nobility and longevity.

Asian Art Department, AGNSW, January 2012.


Details


Other Title

Imperial Duke's insignia


Place where the work was made

China


Media category

Textile


Materials used

'kesi' [woven silk]


Dimensions

26.0 x 27.3 cm


Signature & date

Not signed. Not dated.


Credit

Gift of Judith and Ken Rutherford 2000


Location

Not on display


Accession number

189.2000



Place

Where the work was made
China

Shown in 2 exhibitions

Exhibition history


Referenced in 3 publications

Bibliography


Gary Dickinson and Linda Wrigglesworth, Imperial wardrobe, London, 1990, pg. 127. plate no. 106

Jackie Menzies (Editor), The Asian Collections Art Gallery of New South Wales, 'The Marvel of Porcelain', Sydney, 2003, 126 (colour illus.).

Judith Rutherford and Jackie Menzies (Editors), Celestial silks: Chinese religious & court textiles, Sydney, 2004, 87, 88 (colour illus.). cat.no. 54