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	Image: Giovanni Battista Piranesi The Arch of Constantine 1771 (detail), etching, Art Gallery of NSW

Special lecture: Piranesi as architect

Fabio Barry, assistant professor of art history, Stanford University

This lecture will examine Piranesi’s architecture, particularly the church of Santa Maria del Priorato, in the light of such topics as the reuse of spoils and debate over the relative merits of Roman and Greek antiquity. It accompanies the Gallery’s exhibition of European works on paper that features several of the ‘Vedute di Roma’ (vistas of Rome) that Piranesi worked on between the late 1740s and his death in 1778.

Fabio Barry is assistant professor in the department of art and art history at Stanford University. He studied architecture at Cambridge and wrote his doctorate at Columbia University on the symbolism of coloured marbles. He has been a fellow at the Centre for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, Washington DC, and at the Italian Academy, New York. Barry’s essay Walking on water: cosmic floors in antiquity and the middle ages, published in the Art Bulletin in 2007, was awarded the Arthur Kingsley Porter Prize by the College Art Association of America.

Presented in association with the National Art School, Sydney.

Image: Giovanni Battista Piranesi The Arch of Constantine 1771 (detail), etching, Art Gallery of NSW

Sunday 31 August 2014, 2pm

Free

Duration 1 hour
Location: Centenary Auditorium

Related exhibition: European prints and drawings 1500-1900