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	Image: still from Andy Warhol (1973) Courtesy National Film and Sound Archive of Australia

Film series: Pop artists on screen

Cinematic portraits of pop artists by artist filmmakers

Using the boundless possibilities of cinematic expression, filmmakers record and interpret the life, work and inspiration of celebrated pop artists, including Richard Hamilton, Andy Warhol, David Hockney and Jim Dine.

Screening in conjunction with the Pop to popism exhibition, Pop artists on screen is part of an extensive program of feature films, documentaries and shorts capturing the authentic flavour of the era.

Image: still from Andy Warhol (1973) Courtesy National Film and Sound Archive of Australia

Wednesdays 5pm
19 November 2014
14 January - 4 February 2015
Special 9.25pm screening 28 January

Free

Films start at the advertised time. Doors open 30 minutes before. Tickets are issued at the Domain Theatre one hour before. Latecomers not admitted.

This is a specialist program designed for mature audiences and is generally not suitable for children under the age of 15. We cannot admit anyone under the age of 18 to films with an R classification or without classification. Babes in arms not permitted. All pagers and mobile phones must be switched off. It is a condition of entry that behaviour does not disturb other audience members.

Related film series:
Pop cinema
Pop Saturdays


Location: Domain Theatre

Related exhibition: Pop to popism

 
National Film & Sound Archive

David Hockney’s diaries / Roy Lichtenstein

David Hockney’s diaries
Dir: Christian Blackwood, Michael Blackwood 1978 (US)
28 mins 16mm Colour Unclassified
A pioneer of pop art, British artist David Hockney has been keeping albums of snapshots since 1967 when picture-taking became his obsessive hobby. In this casual encounter, Hockney slowly turns the pages of his albums, explaining how photos of friends and travels provide the compositional elements on which his paintings and graphic works are based. Print courtesy National Film and Sound Archive of Australia.

Roy Lichtenstein
Dir: Geoffrey Haydon 1979 (US)
29 mins 16mm Colour Unclassified
In the 1960s, as a prominent figure of the New York art scene, American painter Roy Lichtenstein used brash images of American popular culture for his cartoon-style paintings. His canvases of cliched blondes, war heroes, kisses, explosions and junk merchandise documented and parodied the era. In this documentary, Lichtenstein revisits the empty loft that was his New York studio during the 1960s. The space is seen as it was, filled with works from the period. The film then follows the creation of a painting, Amerind Composition, at the artist’s new studio on Long Island. Print courtesy National Film and Sound Archive of Australia.

 

Wednesday 19 November 2014 5pm – 5:57pm

Two films by James Scott

Love’s presentation
1967 (GB)
27 mins 16mm B&W Unclassified
In the first of a series of unconventional films about artists by Scott, we witness the creation of David Hockney’s famous Cavafy Etchings of 1967. To Hockney, who grew up in Bradford during the 1950s, CP Cavafy’s poems evoked a steamy eroticism which – according to the British Museum website – fired the young artist to steal the book from his local library. Hockney’s 1967 etchings are not literal illustrations, but derive from his own experiences of homosexual life in London. The film features witty and irreverent audio commentary by the artist.

Richard Hamilton
1969 (GB)
25 mins 16mm Colour Unclassified
Scott’s brilliant 1969 portrait immerses the viewer in the work and preoccupations of British painter and collage artist Richard Hamilton, acknowledged as one of the founding figures of pop art. Hamilton’s work focuses on the commercial culture of the 1960s. Eliciting full collaboration from the artist, the filmmaker interprets Hamilton’s artistic sources via the boundless possibilities of cinematic expression. Images of Hamilton’s work, original source materials and related elements from pop culture flash by in rapid succession.

 

Wednesday 14 January 2015 5pm – 5:52pm

Andy Warhol

Dir: Lana Jokel 1973 (GB)
54 mins 16mm Colour Unclassified
With a rambling, unstructured style that echoes Andy Warhol’s own approach to filmmaking, this 1973 documentary profiles his career, showing him to be a brilliant manipulator, dedicated voyeur and person of astute commercial judgment. Suggesting that there might be considerable effort, radicalism and cultural relevance within the deceptive simplicity of his art, the film shows Warhol at work at the Factory, relaxing with friends and participating in interviews. Art critic Harold Rosenberg makes the now-famous suggestion that ‘the primary creation of Andy Warhol is Andy Warhol himself’. Print courtesy National Film and Sound Archive of Australia.

 

Wednesday 21 January 2015 5pm – 5:54pm

Edward Ruscha

Dir: Geoffrey Hayden 1979 (GB)
30 mins 16mm Colour Unclassified
This documentary, exploring a moment in the life of American painter Ed Ruscha, was produced for the BBC series Seven artists. It follows Ruscha travelling around Los Angeles as he retrieves a damaged cardboard and papier-mâche ‘rock’ from its permanent site in the Californian desert. He uses it as a mould to make a new tougher fibreglass replacement. The film also shows Ruscha’s half-built house in a remote part of the desert, with a huge canvas word painting used as a temporary roof. Print courtesy National Film and Sound Archive of Australia.

Important: Jim Dine, London will not screen at 5pm on Wednesday 28 January with Edward Ruscha as previously advertised. Instead, it will screen at 9.25pm along with a repeat screening of Edward Ruscha, immediately after the 7.30pm screening of Basquiat in our Pop cinema program. We apologise for any inconvenience.

 

Wednesday 28 January 2015 5pm – 5:30pm

Jim Dine, London / Edward Ruscha

Jim Dine, London
Dir: Michael Blackwood 1978 (US)
31 mins 16mm Colour Unclassified
Blackwood’s film looks at one of the early American pop artists, Jim Dine. Made during Dine’s four-year stay in London, it shows him working on several large charcoal-and-collage drawings and on a lithography stone while preparing a series of posters. Dine discusses and reads his own poetry. He also watches a performance by the living sculptors Gilbert & George as they perform their deadpan tableau Underneath the arches. Print courtesy National Film and Sound Archive of Australia.

Edward Ruscha
Dir: Geoffrey Hayden 1979 (GB)
30 mins 16mm Colour Unclassified
This documentary, exploring a moment in the life of American painter Ed Ruscha, was produced for the BBC series Seven artists. It follows Ruscha travelling around Los Angeles as he retrieves a damaged cardboard and papier-mâche ‘rock’ from its permanent site in the Californian desert. He uses it as a mould to make a new tougher fibreglass replacement. The film also shows Ruscha’s half-built house in a remote part of the desert, with a huge canvas word painting used as a temporary roof. Print courtesy National Film and Sound Archive of Australia.

 

Wednesday 28 January 2015 9:25pm – 10:26pm

Ubu portraits

Ubu Films was Australia’s first truly underground film movement. In a conservative environment where local feature-film production languished, Ubu spearheaded a radically non-commercial culture of film production, distribution and exhibition. Established mid 1965 by Albie Thoms, David Perry, Aggy Read and John Clark, Ubu drew upon both the rise of filmmaking cooperatives internationally and Sydney’s own burgeoning spirit of youth protest and underground experimentation. Screening in vacant theatres, halls, lounge rooms and cinemas in Sydney and interstate, Ubu’s work spanned handmade, structural and collage films, as well as early genre parodies, later venturing into lightshows and expanded cinema events. Prints courtesy National Film and Sound Archive of Australia.
Ubu portraits program and notes courtesy Ruby Arrowsmith-Todd.

Album
Dir: David Perry 1970 (Aust)
5 mins 16mm Colour Unclassified
In this short self-portrait, Ubu Films co-founder Perry mines his archive of family photographs, home videos and exhibited 16mm film to fast-forward, reverse and freeze-frame narratives and reminiscences.

Ding a ding day
Dir: Garry Shead 1961-66 (Aust)
10 mins 16mm B&W Unclassified
This assembly of home-movie footage, shot between 1961 and 1966, was made by artist and filmmaker Shead. Homegrown pop artist Martin Sharp and writer Richard Neville appear in a sequence covering the birth of Oz magazine. The film’s impressionistic fragments capture the mood of the youth counterculture in early 1960s Sydney.

David Perry
Dir: Albie Thoms 1968 (Aust)
4 mins 16mm Colour Unclassified
In this kinetic tribute to his Ubu Films collaborator Perry, Thoms combined tests and offcuts from early films with film fragments found on Perry’s editing room at ABC-TV. The Textacolour marks were intended as homage to Perry’s pioneering handmade films.

De da de dum
Dir: Garry Shead 1968 (Aust)
20 mins 16mm B&W Unclassified
Artist/poet/novelist/singer Pip Proud was being feted in the media as an underground superstar at the time this experimental documentary was made. The film shows Pip’s reactions to automated, ritualised city life, using altered speed photography and, in some instances, incision and puncturing of the film stock.

 

Wednesday 4 February 2015 5pm – 5:39pm